Writer Appears to Side With Prosecution Against Army Drill Sergeant Accused of Multiple Sexual Assaults

The number of inflammatory and suggestive words in a St. Louis Post-Dispatch article published today about the court-martial of an Army drill sergeant on sexual assault charges leaves me speechless. Almost.

Army SHARP

It may turn out that the accused, Staff Sgt. Angel M. Sanchez, committed these acts. Whether he did or not, however, I take issue with the way writer Jesse Bogan approached this story. Why? Because it appears Bogan might be working for the prosecution on this first day of the Soldier’s court-martial at Fort Leonard Wood, 147 miles southwest of St. Louis.

According to Bogan, several women at the sprawling base in the south-central Missouri Ozarks say Sergeant Sanchez added to a legacy of sex abuse that has plagued the military. Really?  Plagued the military?  The only people who believe sexual assault has plagued the military share the mindset of Sen. Claire McCaskill (D-Mo.) and seem to believe every military man who’s ever noticed that a woman looks different than a man is guilty of rape — or, at a minimum, sexual assault.

Six paragraphs below, Bogan wrote another line — Jaw-dropping reports of sexual misconduct within the ranks have led to outrage and action on Capitol Hill in recent years to reform the military’s criminal justice system. — supportive of Senator McCaskill’s witch-hunting efforts but light years apart from the reality of what military life is like.

Rather than rehash so much of the source information that makes the senator and the writer look foolish, I’ll point both of them to a piece published Aug. 28 and suggest they read it.  Incredibly, it takes into account the views of people who stand opposite Senator McCaskill when it comes to her sexual assault witch hunt. Plus, it reminds me of the term that once described a true journalist:  objective.

In addition, I’ll suggest the liberally-dynamic duo read my first nonfiction book, Three Days In August, as an example of how an agenda-driven prosecution ruined a man’s career and life as an elite American warfighter and member of the Army’s Green Beret fraternity.

If the reporter reads either of the items I suggested, readers of the Post-Dispatch might see improved reporting on the topic of sexual assault in the military one day in the future. If the senator reads either of them, I suspected she will never admit to it; hence, the reason she needs to be retired at the first election-day opportunity.

To order a copy of Three Days In August, click here.

Click on image above to order Bob's books.

Click on image above to order Bob’s books.

Afghans in USA Missing After Vetting Process Fails Again

This morning, I came across a recent CBS News article about the disappearance of two Afghans who were in the United States to receive specialized training from the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration. Based on what I learned during a four-year investigation into the federal government’s use of credibility assessment technologies, including the polygraph, I believe Americans have reason to be concerned about these men.

Left to right: Mohd Naweed Samimi and Mohammad Yasin Ataye.

Left to right: Mohd Naweed Samimi and Mohammad Yasin Ataye.

Alarm bells began ringing in my mind after I read that, according to a DEA spokesperson cited in the article, Mohammad Yasin Ataye, 22, and Mohd Naweed Samimi, 24, were part of a group of 31 Afghan police officers participating in an intensive five-week training program to combat drug trafficking in Quantico, Va. Why? Because I learned long ago about the vetting process used to screen Afghans seeking positions with Afghan military, police and security agencies. It has worked so well that, during the seven years since Defense Department officials began keeping records of such attacks, 144 coalition members — mostly Americans — have been killed and 183 have been wounded [source] by supposedly-vetted individuals committing so-called “Green-on-Blue” attacks.

Click on image above to order book.

Click on image above to order book.

Alarm bells continued to sound off after I read the first sentence of the article’s fourth paragraph:  According to the DEA, each candidate is extensively vetted and polygraphed. A long line of Americans whose initial and continuing employment with federal government agencies (CIA, FBI, NSA et al) were subject to passing periodic polygraph examinations went on to be convicted of espionage against the United States. Most recently, Edward Snowden made the news for allegedly leaking a plethora of highly-classified intelligence data after passing polygraph exams.

To learn more about why I’m troubled by the disappearance of these Afghans, read The Clapper Memo. My second nonfiction book, it features never-before-published details obtained from top government officials, including individuals who interrogated members of Saddam Hussein‘s inner circle (i.e., “Deck of Cards”) and detainees at Guantanamo Bay. Plus, it has received rave reviews from some high-profile individuals.

To read other posts about The Clapper Memo, click here.

Click on image above to order Bob's books.

Click on image above to order Bob’s books.