Tag Archives: Bob McCarty

Bob McCarty is the author of two nonfiction books, Three Days In August (October 2011) and The Clapper Memo (May 2013), and one fiction novel, The National Bet (August 2014). All are available for purchase at Amazon.com.

Intel Boss ‘Truly Insane,’ According to Former CIA Director

In a McClatchy News article today, Marisa Taylor reports that Director of National Intelligence James R. Clapper Jr. issued a new polygraph policy Sept. 14 which requires federal government agencies conducting polygraph exams to ask applicants and employees if they have leaked classified information to the media. Doing so places him among the “truly insane,” according to one former CIA director.

Former CIA Director John Deutch quoted in New York Times 12/10/1995.

Former CIA Director John Deutch quoted in New York Times 12/10/1995.

On page 6 of a New York Times article published Dec. 10, 1995, reporter Tim Weiner quoted former CIA Director John Deutch talking about the CIA, saying, “Their reliance on the polygraph is truly insane,” and I couldn’t agree more.

What Clapper, the nation’s top intelligence official, ignores by issuing a new polygraph policy and, more importantly, by remaining joined at the hip with backers of century-old polygraph technology, is a long list of polygraph failures.

In Chapter 15 of my second nonfiction book, The Clapper Memo, I not only challenge readers to conduct their own research of convicted spies such as John Anthony Walker Jr., Jonathan Jay Pollard, Ana Belen Montes, and other U.S. government employees, but I let them know what they’ll find — that is, that the vast majority of those convicted of spying for foreign governments had been subject to regular polygraph examinations as a condition of their federal government employment. Some spied for years and years before being caught! Edward Snowden is merely the most recent example of an intelligence professional with a high-level security clearance to make reliance on the polygraph appear foolish.

Further into the same chapter, I share details about other well-known top government officials and their feelings about the polygraph.

I cite an article published Dec. 20, 1985, in the Los Angeles Times. In it, Norman Kempster reported that George Schulz, then serving as President Ronald Reagan’s Secretary of State, was not a fan of the polygraph and, in fact, had threatened to resign rather than submit to a polygraph examination.

I also point to an article, published in the March 8, 1994, edition of The New York Times. In it, Ronald Kessler shared details about how former CIA Director R. James Woolsey seemed to harbor the same sentiment about the polygraph:

The day after the arrest of the accused spy Aldrich H. Ames was announced, the Director of Central Intelligence, R. James Woolsey, met with several hundred C.I.A. employees in the agency’s auditorium at Langley, Virginia. After recounting what employees already knew from the news media, Mr. Woolsey — whose address was seen on closed-circuit television by every C.I.A. employee — spent five minutes explaining why he himself had refused to take a polygraph test, as other recent directors had done. Besides the fact that political appointees are not required to take such tests, Mr. Woolsey said he remained “skeptical” about the polygraph’s effectiveness.

Why does Clapper stick with this highly-suspect technology? To answer that question, I conducted a four-year investigation into the federal government’s use of so-called credibility assessment technologies, including the polygraph. My findings appear inside The Clapper Memo, a book that has received rave reviews from several top-flight people whose names you might recognize.

To learn more about the findings of my investigation, read other posts about the book.

To understand everything I’ve uncovered, order a copy of The Clapper Memo.

Click on image above to order Bob's books.

Click on image above to order Bob’s books.

It’s Time to Stop Putting ‘Lipstick’ on the Polygraph ‘Pig’

Federal government officials keep putting the proverbial “lipstick” on the “pig” that is the polygraph despite the fact a newer technology — proven far more accurate and effective in places like Afghanistan, Iraq and Guantanamo Bay — is available and being used by more than 1,800 local and state law enforcement agencies.

FBI--Concealed Information Test

The latest effort to improve the appearance of the polygraph appears in an article by Blake McConnell and Timothy J. Weber, Ed.D. — a retired FBI polygraph examiner and a former federal polygraph instructor, respectively — in the Aug. 5 edition of FBI Law Enforcement Bulletin.

Beneath the article’s headline, the authors go to great lengths to describe the differences between the traditional polygraph and this new approach, known as the Concealed Information Test.  What they ignore, however, is the “elephant in the room” — that is, the fact that countermeasures exist to defeat the century-old polygraph technology.

After spending most of four years investigating the federal government’s use of so-called credibility assessment technologies, including the polygraph, I challenge anyone who doesn’t believe the polygraph can be defeated by countermeasures to explain how so many federal government employees and contractors have passed periodic polygraph exams conditional with their initial and/or continued employment — usually with high-level security clearances — before going on to commit espionage and/or leak national security secrets — against the United States.

In addition, I challenge anyone to disprove my contention that a turf war has been raging for more than 40 years between polygraph loyalists and challengers to the polygraph who simply want investigators — in the federal military, law enforcement and intelligence communities — to have access to the best tools available.

Before you accept my challenge, I suggest you read the rest of the findings from my investigation. They appear in my second nonfiction book, The Clapper Memo.

Featuring never-before-published details obtained from top government officials, including individuals who used non-polygraph technology to interrogate members of Saddam Hussein‘s inner circle (i.e., “Deck of Cards”) and detainees at Guantanamo Bay, The Clapper Memo has received rave reviews from people whose names you might recognize (i.e., people who know what it’s like to be in the fight).

To learn more about this turf war and the non-polygraph technology being suppressed by federal government agencies, read more posts about the book. To understand everything I’ve uncovered, order a copy of The Clapper Memo. You’ll be glad you did!

Click on image above to order Bob's books.

Click on image above to order Bob’s books.