Tag Archives: Green Beret

Bob McCarty’s Weekly Recap: Feb. 1-7

In addition to spending a lot of time working on my first screenplay, I adopted a one-post-per-day approach to things during the first week of February 2015 at BobMcCarty.com.

INELIGIBLE: Sen. Ted Cruz (R-TX), Gov. Bobby Jindal (R-LA), Sen. Marco Rubio (R-FL) and former Sen. Rick Santorum (R-PA).

INELIGIBLE? Sen. Ted Cruz (R-TX), Gov. Bobby Jindal (R-LA), Sen. Marco Rubio (R-FL) and former Sen. Rick Santorum (R-PA). Click image above to read about this topic.

On the same day I published my last weekly recap, I shared a guest piece written by Paul R. Hollrah, a resident of Oklahoma who writes from the perspective of a veteran conservative politico who served two terms as a member of the Electoral College, the piece makes some people angry. See if it makes you angry. Read Is Writer ‘Beating Dead Horse’ or Adhering to Constitution?

Markers are mandatory after passage of the Pipeline Safety Improvement Act of 2002.

Click image above to read my piece about underground pipeline dangers.

After reading news about a ruptured natural gas pipeline forcing the evacuation of area residents near Bowling Green, Mo., I decided to share anew a story I had written and published Sept. 13, 2010, about one Missouri family’s experience with underground pipelines running through their backyard. Read the piece I published Feb. 1 under the headline, Bowling Green Pipeline Rupture Stirs Backyard Fears.

Barely one year ago, six members of Congress called for Director of National Intelligence James R. Clapper Jr. to resign after he lied to Congress about the National Security Agency’s data collection programs. On Feb. 1, I shared an update. Read it under the headline, Intel Chief Remains in Post One Year After Call for His Ouster.

Click image above to order a copy of The Clapper Memo.

Click image above to order a copy of The Clapper Memo.

After reading multiple articles about the 80th anniversary of the first occasion on which the polygraph was used to help bring about a conviction in a U.S. court, I felt compelled to share some unique observations from my perspective as author of The Clapper Memo, a book in which I share findings from my exhaustive four-year investigation of credibility assessment technologies. Read my take on the polygraph in a Feb. 3 piece published under the headline, Polygraph Makes Headlines for Age, Not Reliability.

After anchor Brian Williams used his NBC Nightly News platform to offer what his network would later describe as “clarification” about an incident that had allegedly taken place more than a decade earlier, I shared details of a personal experience I had with Williams at the Air Force base where I was stationed in the spring of 1991. Read the humorous details in my Feb. 5 piece, NBC Anchor ‘Clarifies’ Fact He’s Been Lying for 12 Years.

U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Christopher Boitz

Click on image above to read about my personal experience with Brian Williams.

When I asked a former Army Green Beret how many kills he had recorded as an American sniper during three tours of duty in Iraq, he used a lot of words to explain how such numbers can be hard to tally but never gave me an actual number. Find out what he did tell me in my Feb. 5 piece, Sniper: ‘I believed I had the ability to change the playing field’.

Former Army Green Beret Sgt. 1st Class Kelly A. Stewart in Iraq.

Click on image above to read about an American sniper whose story turned out different than Chris Kyle.

Though a Department of Defense puff piece focused on the Capitol Hill testimony Thursday of a high-ranking DoD official and the question of whether or not the detention facility at Guantánamo Bay should be closed, I focused on GITMO-focused statements made about the facility and detainees held there by first-term Sen. Tom Cotton (R-Ark.) in a piece published Feb. 7. Read it: Arkansas’ Freshman Senator Shreds Obama Administration False Narrative on Guantanamo Bay Detention Facility.

The list of other items I shared on my Facebook page this week includes a photo taken by Brian Williams when he became the first man to walk on the moon July 21, 1969, and a piece in which retired Army Maj. Gen. Paul Vallely is quoted as calling for NBC’s Williams to be canned. Yes, he’s the same Army general who endorsed my book, The Clapper Memo.

As I say every week, thanks for stopping by!

For links to other articles of interest as well as photos and commentary, join me on Facebook and Twitter.  Please show your support by buying my books and encouraging your friends and loved ones to do the same.  To learn how to order signed copies, click here. Thanks in advance!

Click on image above to order Bob's books.

Click on image above to order Bob’s books.

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Sniper: ‘I believed I had the ability to change the playing field’

When I asked a former Army Green Beret how many kills he had recorded as a sniper during three tours of duty in Iraq, he used a lot of words to explain how such numbers can be hard to tally but never gave me an actual number. He did, however, tell me this:  “For me it wasn’t the numbers. I went back over and over because I believed I had the ability to change the playing field.”

Former Army Green Beret Sgt. 1st Class Kelly A. Stewart in Iraq.

Former Army Green Beret Sgt. 1st Class Kelly A. Stewart in Iraq.

While those words may sound like words spoken by the late Chris Kyle, whose legendary exploits as a Navy SEAL during four tours of duty in Iraq are portrayed in the blockbuster film, American Sniper, they were not. Instead, they were shared with me during an online conversation two days ago with Kelly Stewart, the former Army Green Beret sniper — and, later, sniper instructor  — whose life story is chronicled in my first nonfiction book, Three Days In August.

After watching the Clint Eastwood-directed American Sniper and after getting to know Stewart during 18 months spent researching, conducting interviews and writing Three Days In August and since the release of the book in October 2011, I stand by the admittedly-biased opinion I shared in my most-recent weekly recap — that is, that Stewart’s story, as it appears in Three Days In August, would make a better film than American Sniper.

How did I reach that conclusion? Allow me to explain.

American Sniper failed to deliver the kind of emotional impact I had anticipated. When I walked out of the theater, I felt as if I had not had been robbed in an odd sort of way that has nothing to do with the prices of tickets, drinks or snacks at the theater.

Maybe it’s because I’m so much closer to Stewart that I experienced a plethora of emotions — anger, sympathy and frustration, just to name a few — while working on Three Days In August. When you read the book, I think you’ll experience many of the same emotions — especially in a few select sections of the book.

Kelly A. Stewart's uniform was covered with signs of his life as a Top One Percent Special Forces Soldier.

Kelly A. Stewart’s uniform was covered with signs of his life as a Top One Percent Special Forces Soldier.

During the courtroom scene, as Stewart faces a possible life sentence, you’ll applaud him for refusing to answer questions from the prosecutor when, by answering those questions in an open courtroom, he would have revealed classified information and violated his code of conduct.

You might find yourself having a hard time deciding what advice to give Stewart following his moment of decision after the court-martial panel issues its verdict at the end of the second day of the military trial.

And you might find yourself welling up with pride for Stewart while reading the chapter, The Last Mission In Iraq. In that chapter, a Green Beret describes serving with Stewart for eight months in 2006 when both were members of a Special Operations Task Force Operations Detachment Alpha (a.k.a., “A-Team”). It includes this description of a scene in which Stewart embodied the prototypical war hero portrayed by actors like John Wayne and Sylvester Stallone in so many movies over the years:

“I had to put down my gun in order to treat this casualty, but there were still bullets flying around—buzzing around our heads like bees, quite literally. So that was hard for me to do, but (Kelly) reassured me that he had me covered. Kelly stood over the top of me and the casualty pretty much the whole time on the way back out of Sadr City, and it was under intense fire.”

Click image above to order book.

Click image above to order book.

Of course, there’s much more inside the pages of Three Days In August. After reading this article and seeing who has endorsed the book, I hope you’ll order a copy.

WORTH NOTING: Due to the politically-correct environment that permeates Hollywood these days, I do not expect the story told in this book to appear on the silver screen anytime soon.

UPDATE 2/25/2015 at 1:24 p.m. Central:  A friend sent me a link to an article published under the headline, The Making of a Real American Sniper. It helps explain what Kelly Stewart told me as highlighted in the blue portion of this article’s lead paragraph. Hope you’ll read and share.

UPDATE 4/19/2015 at 1:12 p.m. Central: Check out the limited-time free-books offer here.

For links to other articles of interest as well as photos and commentary, join me on Facebook and Twitter.  Please show your support by buying my books and encouraging your friends and loved ones to do the same.  To learn how to order signed copies, click here. Thanks in advance!

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