Tag Archives: interrogation

Arkansas’ Freshman Senator Shreds Obama Administration False Narrative on Guantanamo Bay Detention Facility

According to a Department of Defense puff piece today that focuses on the Capitol Hill testimony of Brian P. McKeon yesterday, the question is not whether to close the detention facility at Guantánamo Bay, it’s how to do it. Others, including first-term Sen. Tom Cotton (R-Ark.), offer an opinion seemingly 180 degrees opposite the one espoused by the principal deputy undersecretary of defense for policy and the Obama Administration.

Beginning at the 3:00-minute mark in the video above, Senator Cotton grills McKeon about the Obama Administration’s false narrative that the mere existence of the detention facility at Guantánamo Bay has caused more terror attacks. Then he gets to the heart of his argument:

“Islamic terrorists don’t need an excuse to attack the United States. They don’t attack us for what they do, they attack us for who we are. It is not a security decision. It is a political decision based upon the promise the president made on his campaign. To say that it is a security decision based upon the propaganda value that our enemies get from it is a pretext to justify a political decision.

“In my opinion, the only problem with Guantánamo Bay is there are too many empty beds and cells there right now. We should be sending more terrorists there for further interrogation to keep this country safe. As far as I’m concerned, every last one of them can rot in hell. But as long as they can’t do that, they can rot in Guantánamo Bay.”

Though I would not wish anyone to “rot in hell” as the senator did, I do agree with the other 99 percent of his stance on the issue.

Why? Because I conducted an exhaustive four-year investigation into the federal government’s use of so-called “credibility assessment” technologies at places like Guantánamo Bay and share never-before-published details from my investigation in my second nonfiction book, The Clapper Memo.

Click on graphic above to order book.

Click on graphic above to order book.

For the short-version details about what is truly wrong with how the federal government has handled the situation at Guantánamo Bay since the beginning of what was once known as the Global War On Terror, read the two pieces below:

The Uniformed Military Balked at ‘Enhanced Interrogation’ Because They Had Better Option in Now-Banned Technology

Investigation Reveals Never-Before-Published Truths About Early Days of ‘Global War on Terror’ at Guantanamo Bay

For the long version of what’s wrong, order a copy of The Clapper Memo.

UPDATE 4/19/2015 at 1:21 p.m. Central: Check out the limited-time free-books offer here.

Click on image above to order Bob's books.

For links to other articles of interest as well as photos and commentary, join me on Facebook and Twitter.  Please show your support by buying my books and encouraging your friends and loved ones to do the same.  To learn how to order signed copies, click here. Thanks in advance!

Click on image above to order Bob's books.

Click on image above to order Bob’s books.

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Most of the Great People I Met in Orlando Were Cops

Police officers across the country have received a lot of negative attention in the press in recent months, but I’m not going to add to it here. Why? Because I met some of the most interesting and dedicated people in the world Monday and Tuesday in Orlando, and most of them were law enforcement professionals of one type or another.

Chad Jeansonne (center) received the 2014 James L. Chapman Award for Excellence Tuesday from the National Association of Computer Voice Stress Analysts. Shown with him are previous award recipients Marigo Stathis and Bob McCarty.

Chad Jeansonne (center) received the 2014 James L. Chapman Award for Excellence Tuesday from the National Association of Computer Voice Stress Analysts. Shown with him are previous award recipients Marigo Stathis and Bob McCarty.

I met approximately 80 of them after traveling to the Central Florida city to speak Tuesday afternoon during the 2015 CVSA Advanced Examiners Conference at Disney’s Coronado Springs Resort. Most represented law enforcement, corrections and other agencies from across the United States as well as Canada, Mexico and a handful of other countries, but all were familiar with the non-polygraph credibility assessment technology known as the Computer Voice Stress Analyzer — or CVSA. Why? Because they are experts in conducting CVSA exams as part of criminal investigations, pre-employment screenings and efforts to monitor certain types of parolees, including sex offenders.

After I spoke for about 45 minutes on the CVSA-related subject matter of my second nonfiction book, The Clapper Memo (May 2013), I think they learned even more.

Following my presentation, one CVSA examiner received an award.

Bunkie (La.) Police Detective Chad Jeansonne received the 2014 Professor James L. Chapman Award for Excellence from the National Association of Computer Voice Stress Analysts. Named after a man recognized as the world’s foremost expert on the use of voice stress analysis before he passed away unexpectedly in April 2012, the award is given annual to an individual recognized for “Excellence in Research and Contributing to the Worldwide Body of Knowledge Concerning Voice Stress Analysis.”

In the photo above, Detective Jeansonne is flanked by yours truly and by Marigo Stathis, the neuroscientist from Baltimore who worked with Professor Chapman to complete his groundbreaking CVSA study shortly before he died.

Jeansonne is one of the many CVSA examiners I interviewed by phone during the four-year investigation that preceded the book’s release, so meeting him in person was nice.

In addition to Jeansonne, however, I also met several other individuals in person for the first time after interviewing them years earlier about their experiences as CVSA examiners. They included: Mike DeFrancisco, a fire/arson investigator from Columbus, Ohio; Bill Endler, one of the most-experienced CVSA examiners and instructors in the world; and Stathis.

Among the many others I met were two Canadians, Don Wiebe, one of the world’s leading interview and interrogation experts, and his business partner Bob Wall, a highly-decorated interview and interrogation expert with more than 30 years experience. I also Mike McQuillan, a retired Prince George’s County, Md., homicide detective who now serves as a CVSA instructor.

Of course, there were others. At the end of my two-day tripe, however, I can assure you I will share many more CVSA-related stories in the not-too-distant future, thanks largely to the folks named above. So stay tuned!

The only downside of the Orlando trip involved returning to the St. Louis area this morning to find the temperature in low double-digits.

Weather Comparison 1-7-2015

Returning to the St. Louis area from Orlando required getting used to what felt like a 71-degree difference in temperatures.

To learn more about The Clapper Memo, order a copy today!

UPDATE 4/19/2015 at 1:23 p.m. Central: Check out the limited-time free-books offer here.

For links to other articles of interest as well as photos and commentary, join me on Facebook and Twitter.  Please show your support by buying my books and encouraging your friends and loved ones to do the same.  To learn how to order signed copies, click here. Thanks in advance!

Click on image above to order Bob's books.

B Click on image above to order Bob’s books.

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