Tag Archives: Missouri

Prediction: World Series Will Bring More Racial Unrest to STL

You might be tempted to label this “premature” since the St. Louis Cardinals still must win the National League Championship Series in order for it to become a reality, but indulge me for a few minutes as I wax poetic about the prospect of more racial unrest in St. Louis during the 2014 World Series.

The graphic above shows a list of the organizations endorsing "Ferguson October" Oct. 10-13.

The graphic above shows a list of the organizations endorsing “Ferguson October” Oct. 10-13.

Caveat: Because I’m not a St. Louis native, I escaped the formal indoctrination program that is part of early-education programs for all who live in the shadow of the Gateway Arch. I did, however, take part in a distance-learning version of the program. You see, as a child in my forever hometown of Enid, Okla., I listened to Cardinals ballgames on the Cardinals Radio Network via KCRC-AM 1390. That, combined with the fact I’ve lived in the area for 14 years, makes me at least partially qualified to comment on local events. So here I go.

If the St. Louis Cardinals defeat the San Francisco Giants in the NLCS and find themselves in the position of hosting at least three Major League Baseball World Series games at Busch Stadium during the final ten days of October, I predict downtown St. Louis — instead of little ol’ Ferguson, Mo. — will become the epicenter of more racial unrest and protests waged by members of the “Hands Up Don’t Shoot” crowd — still upset over the deadly shooting of 18-year-old Mike Brown by police officer Darren Wilson and unwilling to wait for the grand jury to determine whether charges should be filed against Wilson — will be hijacked by groups with no direct connection to anyone in St. Louis.

In case you haven’t heard, a practice event is scheduled to begin Friday and run through Monday. Formally known as Ferguson October, the event is endorsed by a laundry list of local, state and national organizations, many of them extremely radical (see graphic above). That list includes, but is not limited to, the following:

The Organization for Black Struggle — According to the group’s website, their program is “based upon the Black Freedom Agenda that was introduced at the founding of the Black Radical Congress in 1998 and ratified in 1999.”

Code Pink — A radical organization known, among other things, for its support of Hamas and other terror groups;

Million Hoodies Movement for Justice — “Established in March 2012 in response to the murder of Trayvon Martin,” according to its website, this group appears to advocate some worthwhile causes while also having a funny name and some seriously-misguided beliefs about guns and gun laws; and

New Black Panthers Party — After a long absence, this group reemerged on the national scene in November 2008 after some of its members were observed intimidating voters at a polling place in Philadelphia and then assisted by Obama Administration appointees who interfered with their prosecution;

The names of several other pro-union, anti-Israel, pro-Islam and left-wing political groups appear on the laundry list as well. Curiously, however, neither Al Sharpton’s National Action Network or Jesse Jackson’s Rainbow PUSH Coalition are listed on the website as being involved in this so-called “Weekend of Resistance.”  Rest assured, if the protest attracts national news media attention — and you know it will since its set to overlap with the first two NLCS games being played Saturday and Sunday — St. Louis-area residents can count on both race-baiting reverends to be there with bells on.

Factor in the possibility that gunfights — like the one that killed two and injured another in downtown St. Louis earlier this week — and Ebola might break out during the same period, and St. Louis could rocket back into the world media spotlight — and for all the wrong reasons.

“Postseason tickets! Get your post-season tickets here!

UPDATE 10/08/2014 at 12:13 p.m. Central:  After posting the piece above, I saw this article about Missouri authorities reportedly planning for possible riots if Officer Wilson isn’t indicted. Am I the only one now wondering if an announcement about the grand jury’s decision might be delayed until after the World Series? It wouldn’t surprise me if that happened. Just sayin’.

UPDATE 10/10/2014 at 7:10 a.m. Central:  Another officer-involved shooting of a young black man in St. Louis has tensions at a fever pitch. According to  this local news article, at least one police officer was injured when violence erupted Thursday night, as protesters blocked traffic, broke windows of at least one home and a business and burned American flags.

Click on image above to order Bob's books.

Click on image above to order Bob’s books.

Was It ‘Sudden Jihad Syndrome’ or Something Else? Suspect in Bus Station Murder Still Not Prosecuted After Three Years

Three years ago this week, Mohamed Dawod found himself charged with the murder of Justin Hall, 32, of Mt. Vernon, Ohio, at a Greyhound bus station in Springfield, Mo. As of today, he has not been prosecuted for his alleged role in the deadly shooting that took place less than 48 hours before the 10th anniversary of the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001.

Mohamed H. Dawod

Mohamed H. Dawod

Whether or not terrorism was involved, however, remains up in the air to this day, thanks in part to officials in the Southwest Missouri community who were quick to say the shooting by the 25-year-old from Scottsdale, Ariz., appeared random, according to a report in the Springfield News-Leader. But was it really?

According to a Sept. 9, 2011, report on KSPR-TV, Springfield police said that, because of a language barrier, they only learned Dawod’s name and have asked the FBI to help them with the investigation. Also in that report was this telling paragraph:

Ten separate witnesses say they did not notice the men fighting or arguing before the shooting. One passenger said she watched the suspect wander around the terminal until the call to line up to re-board the bus. “She then observed the suspect remove a silver and black handgun from a back pack he was carrying,” the officer wrote. “The suspect then pointed the handgun upward while saying something. The witness could not understand what the suspect said and didn’t know if he was speaking English.” No matter what was said the witness said Hall didn’t react or turn around. Shortly after the witness says Dawod shot him from a few feet away.

Witnesses featured in two television news reports, however, seem to reveal more than the “official” story lets on about the deadly incident that involved a man with a Muslim name and Middle East appearance shooting someone he did not know less than 48 hours ahead of the 10th anniversary of the Sept. 11 attacks on the United States.

The first television report, which aired on St. Louis NBC affiliate KSDK prior to any names being released or charges filed, featured witnesses saying it appeared the assailant would have kept shooting if not for the fact that his gun jammed. The second report, which aired on the same station after the Springfield Police Department announced the alleged shooter’s name and charges against him, offered much the same story.

Not surprisingly, Dawod pleaded not guilty during an arraignment Sept. 12, 2011. The extent to which Dawod would carry out some form of “legal jihad” — that is, causing the U.S. court system to waste as much time, effort and money as possible on his case — remained to be seen.

Could it be that, when Dawod pointed the handgun in the air, he shouted, “Alluh Akbar,” the cry that’s been heard coming from the mouths of so many Islamic extremists moments before they suffer from so-called “sudden jihad syndrome”? No answer to that question yet, so let’s fast-forward to a news report published Sept. 14, 2011, in the Springfield News-Leader.

Based largely on interviews with three people who were at the scene of the shooting, the article included two observations — that the shooter tried to fire again but could not because his gun jammed and that the witnesses believed the shooter intended to shoot several people. In addition, however, it noted that Patrick Beeman, a friend and traveling companion of the victim, said Dawod asked police a question in English after he was arrested: “He said, ‘if I quit shooting at people, can I get back on the bus?'” That, of course, made many wonder if he spoke and understood English after all.

On Sept. 25, 2011, it was revealed in another report — no longer online at NBC4i.com — that, in addition to a handgun, Dawod had a 9-inch knife and 37 rounds of ammunition when arrested.

Within 90 days of his arrest, Dawod was ordered by a judge to undergo psychiatric evaluations, and today, it seems, he remains “under observation.” Though I searched for updated information on CaseNet, the online site where one can typically find information related to civil and criminal cases, I could find no record of the Dawod case.

Click on image above to order Bob's books.

Click on image above to order Bob’s books.