Tag Archives: Special Operations

Army Prosecutor Wanted Special Forces Soldier to Break Law, Discuss Classified Info in Open Court; He Refused

Facing a possible life sentence if convicted, Army Green Beret Sgt. 1st Class Kelly A. Stewart faced substantial grilling by the Army prosecutor who seemed to want him to discuss classified matters in open court during his court-martial on allegations of rape and kidnapping.  Below are excerpts from Three Days In August: A U.S. Army Special Forces Soldier’s Fight for Military Justice, the book in which I chronicle this highly-decorated Special Forces combat veteran’s toughest battle ever:

Before his court-martial, Kelly A. Stewart's uniform was covered with signs of his life as an elite Special Forces Soldier.

Kelly A. Stewart’s uniform was covered with signs of his life as an elite Special Forces Soldier until the lies one woman told in a military courtroom brought his life and career to a crashing end.

“They just wanted me to admit that I spoke German, that I am trained in all this ‘secret squirrel’ stuff to beat and interrogate people and everything else,” Stewart said, noting that it’s a facade and that Green Beret professionals like himself are trusted to do national-level stuff for the president of our country on a daily basis.

“The one thing I wouldn’t say in there was… a lie. I told the truth (in response) to the questions that were asked of me.”

What if he had answered all of their questions in open court?

“If I had went up there and said, in a statement, that we do some type of training like, ‘We do free fall blindfolded, you know, to work on the psychological aspects of the mind…’ that reporter that I knew was in the courtroom… what would that person have written in the Stars & Stripes?”

The excerpts above stand as a smidgen of what’s contained in nearly 300 pages taken directly from the Record of Trial, other trial-related documents and interviews with key players involved in the case.

To learn more about why Stewart, a man who served his country honorably, should have never been prosecuted or convicted, order and read Three Days In August. In it, you’ll find all of the blow-by-blow details of the court-martial and post-trial hearing.

To learn more about the book and read two high-profile reviews before you order, click here.

To read other posts about Stewart, click here.

To provide financial assistance to Stewart and his family, click on the “DONATE” button at SaveThisSoldier.com, a website built and managed by Stewart’s dad, himself retired after more than 30 years of service in Air Force Special Operations.

Click on image above to order Bob's books.

Click on image above to order Bob’s books.

Believed Innocent, Man Could Leave Prison After 36 Years

Imagine the prospect of being released from prison after spending 36 years behind bars for a crime you did not commit. Sixty-nine-year-old Michael Hanline might get to find out what that feels like next week.

According to news reports like this one, the Ventura (Calif.) County District Attorney’s office announced Tuesday that new evidence had resulted in a judge overturning the conviction — highlighted in the California Innocence Project video above — that had sent Hanline to prison in 1980 after he was found guilty of first-degree murder in J.T. McGarry’s 1978 death.

In this article (below), CIP offers more details of events related to Hanline’s case:

On October 22, 2010, after a lengthy evidentiary hearing and complete review of all of the evidence in the case, United States District Court Magistrate Judge Andrew Wistrich issued a report in Michael’s case, recommending that his conviction be overturned. Judge Wistrich emphasized how the prosecution, investigators, and Robertson had colluded to violate Michael’s constitutional right to have exculpatory information turned over to the defense. Judge Wistrich wrote, “The prosecution was so successful in violating the trial court’s orders and its constitutional obligation that by the time the exculpatory evidence came to light – nearly three decades later – many of the important witnesses had died or disappeared . . . Permitting the prosecutor to engage in this sort of gamesmanship with impunity signals that the constitutional rules established in Brady and its progeny are merely ‘pretend rules’ that need not be taken seriously.”

Collusion between investigators and prosecution attorneys? Violating a defendant’s Constitutional rights? The wrongs alleged to have taken place during Hanline’s case appear strikingly similar to those that took place during the court-martial of Army Sgt. 1st Class Kelly A. Stewart during three days in August 2009.

Once an elite Green Beret and highly-decorated combat veteran, Stewart sees no light at the end of his tunnel and finds himself living under a cloud today, branded as a sex offender for life after being convicted on sexual assault-related charges and sentenced to eight years behind bars at the U.S. Military Disciplinary Barracks at Fort Leavenworth, Kan. He lives under a cloud as the result of being falsely accused by a then-28-year-old German woman who, according to testimony given by her friends during a post-trial hearing, lied several times while on the witness stand during Stewart’s court-martial.

To learn more about Stewart and why this man who served his country with honor should have never been prosecuted or convicted, order and read Three Days In August.

To provide financial assistance to Stewart and his family, click on the “DONATE” button at SaveThisSoldier.com, a website built and managed by Stewart’s dad, himself retired after more than 30 years of service in Air Force Special Operations.

Click on image above to order Bob's books.

Click on image above to order Bob’s books.