Tag Archives: Stars and Stripes

Bob McCarty’s Weekly Recap: Dec. 21-27

I like to think I emphasized quality instead of quantity during the week of Christmas 2014. That in mind, I share highlights of the past seven days at BobMcCarty.com below:

This January 2014 photo shows Butters, my office assistant, looking into his porcelain bowl in an effort to predict how the year might turn out.

This January 2014 photo shows Butters, my office assistant, looking into his porcelain bowl in an effort to predict how the year might turn out. I shared it in a post Dec. 23. To read it, click on the image above.

Sunday, Dec. 21 — Distracted by family obligations, I posted nothing at BobMcCarty.com this day. It gets better below, I promise!

Monday, Dec. 22 — While spending most of my day working on my next book, I did share some good news about my just-released crime fiction novel. Read about it under the self-explanatory headline, The National Bet Receives Two 5-Star Reviews.

Tuesday, Dec. 23 — Under the headline, 2014 ‘Most Unusual Year I’ve Experienced’ Online, I explained what it was that made my eighth year online dramatically different than the previous seven.

Wednesday, Dec. 24 — Because I’m married to a flight attendant, I’m accustomed to being flexible around the holidays. This year, as we had during each of the previous nine, we celebrated Christmas a day early to accommodate her schedule. As a result, I focused on family and food instead of fodder for this website.

Thursday, Dec. 25 — After a Washington Post article about the Centers for Disease Control in Atlanta caught my eye Christmas Eve, I shared details about how the CDC fits into the mystery inside my just-released crime-fiction novel, The National Bet.  Some of those details appear under the headline, Error-Prone CDC Figures Prominently in New Fiction Novel.

Friday, Dec. 26 — Recent news about the al-Shabaab terror group reminded me of the action in the opening chapter of The National Bet, so I shared an excerpt in a post under the headline, Africa-Based Terror Group Plays Part in New Fiction Tale. Later the same day under the headline, Top Intel Official Gets Away With Lies for 53 Weeks (so far), I reminded readers that Director of National Intelligence James R. Clapper Jr. had gotten away with lying to Congress for more than a year thanks to inaction by soon-to-depart Attorney General Eric Holder. I ended the day with humor. Finally, after coming across a 2016 presidential straw poll at Townhall.com, I thought it might be fun to ask my online friends to enter my name as a write-in candidate — so I did ask! Details at Author Asks for Your Presidential Straw Poll Write-In Vote.

Saturday, Dec. 27 — I ended the week with a look back at a shoddy act of journalism that took place two years ago. You can read it where it appears under the headline, Flashback: Stars and Stripes Reporter Fails To Do Her Job.

The remainder of the year will probably be as slow as the past week, so I recommend you get your fix of Bob McCarty by ordering copies of my books. Details about how to do that appear below.

For links to other articles of interest as well as photos and commentary, join me on Facebook and Twitter.  Please show your support by buying my books and encouraging your friends and loved ones to do the same.  Thanks in advance!

Click on image above to order Bob's books.

Click on image above to order Bob’s books.

Flashback: Stars and Stripes Reporter Fails To Do Her Job

Unlike most people who read reporter Nancy Montgomery‘s article two years ago this week in Stars and Stripes, I noticed something terribly wrong in some of the comments attributed to German police detective Daniel Lorch.  His words conflicted with the real-life events in my book, Three Days In August, which chronicles the story of former Army Sgt. 1st Class Kelly A. Stewart and the military justice debacle that ended his stellar career as a Green Beret and landed him behind bars at Fort Leavenworth.

Click image above to order book.

Click image above to order book.

About halfway into her article, Montgomery shared comments made by Detective Lorch about his experience as an investigator and his personal opinion “that (Stewart) was guilty” of a variety of sexual assault-related charges stemming from a one-night stand involving the highly-decorated combat veteran and a then-28-year-old German woman.  The reporter did not, however, include any comments by the detective about the complete lack of physical evidence and eyewitnesses to the alleged crimes.

Montgomery also attributed a statement to the detective about a taxi driver being among the people (plural) who had allegedly seen Stewart’s accuser the morning she left his hotel and later provided corroborating trial testimony.  Apparently, the reporter did not ask the detective for details about those people. Nor did she ask about their testimony during the trial.  Why?  Because, contrary to what the detective must have told her, only the taxi driver testified as a witness during the trail.  Additional witnesses to her departure from the hotel could not be found.

Finally, Montgomery quoted Detective Lorch on the matter of what the taxi driver allegedly saw when she picked up the accuser outside Stewart’s hotel:

“He described, very detailed, very clearly, her physical damage,” Lorch said. “He was sure something very bad had happened to this woman.”

The detective repeatedly referred to the taxi driver in the masculine sense when, in reality, the taxi driver was Monika Haug, a middle-age woman with memory issues.  I highlighted those issues in the book and, more recently, in a post from which the excerpt below appears:

During questioning six months before the trial, according to official documents, Haug told German police officials, “I’m sorry I don’t see her in front of my eyes anymore right now,” later adding, “I believe she had blonde dyed hair.  I don’t remember her clothing or age right now anymore.”

During the trial one year after she had allegedly picked up Stewart’s 28-year-old accuser in front of the Stuttgart-Marriott Hotel in Sindelfingen, Germany, Haug was able to remember accurate details about Stewart’s accuser (i.e., that she was wearing knee-high boots, had long black hair, etc.) that she wasn’t able to remember when it should have been fresh on her mind.  A miracle perhaps or was it coaching by prosecutors that helped Haug “improve” her memory?

Montgomery’s article came 24 days after she had contacted me via email, informing me that she was interested in doing a story about the latest development in the Stewart case, had read my website and wanted to talk.

In a written reply to Montgomery, I told her I had spent a lot of time one year earlier with John Vandiver, a Stuttgart-based Stripes reporter, and that the effort — via phone and email — had yielded not a single story.  Furthermore, I told her, I cited my experience with Vandiver — several emails back and forth plus phone interviews, but no stories — when telling her I wasn’t excited about speaking with Stripes.

Apparently, Montgomery spoke with Vandiver and made no further attempts to obtain my input.  In fact, her name did not appear on my radar again until Stripes published her report about the status of Stewart’s appeals process minus any mention of my name and the name of my book and, more importantly, without several critical details about the case.

If you’re interested in the details of how the military justice system railroaded an elite Special Forces Soldier, read Three Days In August.  Based on 18 months of research, interviews with the key players and access to the actual Record of Trial, this book is available in paperback and ebook versions here.

For a snapshot of Stewart’s situation today and to find out how you can help, read this letter and/or read this recent article. Thanks in advance!

For links to other articles of interest as well as photos and commentary, join me on Facebook and Twitter.  Please show your support by buying my books and encouraging your friends and loved ones to do the same.  To learn how to order signed copies, click here. Thanks in advance!

Click on image above to order Bob's books.

Click on image above to order Bob’s books.