Tag Archives: Three Days In August

Bob McCarty’s first nonfiction book, Three Days In August (October 2011), chronicles the life story and the wrongful conviction and imprisonment of a U.S. Army Green Beret. It’s available for purchase in ebook and paperback formats at Amazon.com.

Bob McCarty Weekly Recap: Aug. 23-29, 2015

Though I produced only a handful of articles during the period, I consider the past week a bountiful one worthy of another weekly recap.

"Green-on-Blue" Casualties: Capt. Matthew D. Roland, 27, and Staff Sgt. Forrest B. Sibley, 31.

“Green-on-Blue” Casualties: Capt. Matthew D. Roland, 27, and Staff Sgt. Forrest B. Sibley, 31.

On Monday, I republished an article under the headline, CODE RED: No Easy Day for Green Beret on Witness Stand. It’s a piece I had shared on the same day two years earlier about Army Sgt. 1st Class Kelly A. Stewart‘s time on the witness stand during his military trial in 2009. Combined with the events that took place before and after the highly-decorated Green Beret combat veteran’s trial, it makes for hair-raising drama inside my first nonfiction book, Three Days In August.

Because financial news was dominating the headlines, I also shared a pertinent excerpt from my first crime-fiction novel, The National Bet, with my Facebook friends on Monday. It includes President Barack Obama saying this:

“So, what does that mean? It means this: if you have an IRA, a 401K, a pension or any other type of retirement plan, it means it will now be held in trust, safe, by the United States Government. And it means you can sleep comfortably tonight knowing it is safe.”

You can read the rest of the piece under the headline, Book Excerpt: Obama Shocks Nation With Executive Order.

On Tuesday, I received life-changing news that will significantly impact my future and my family’s future. Though I cannot reveal details, I can say that it will allow me to continue to write.

Also on Tuesday, I shared a video with my Facebook friends that I had shared with readers of this site seven years earlier. It’s a CNN interview with President Obama’s Kenyan half-brother, George Hussein Onyango Obama, who was living in a hut in a Nairobi slum. I’ll leave it up to you to decide what to make of it.

On Wednesday, I became privy to details about one of the most shocking cases of military injustice ever. As a result, I spent much of that day and the rest of the week digesting dozens of pages of documents. On Thursday, I shared the first details of the case under the headline, Army Lawyer Surfaces in New Bogus Prosecution Effort. You’ll want to stay tuned as I plan to offer extensive pre-trial reporting on the case before it goes to trial in October.

After learning about the “Green-on-Blue” attack deaths of two U.S. Air Force members in Afghanistan Thursday, I recalled the deaths of three young Marines in a similar incident three years earlier. Published Friday, the piece appears under the headline, Preventable ‘Green-on-Blue’ Attack Costs Two American Lives, and points readers to the place where they can learn how such attacks could have been prevented, my second nonfiction book, The Clapper Memo.

For links to other articles of interest as well as photos and commentary, join me on Facebook and Twitter.  Please show your support by buying my books and encouraging your friends and loved ones to do the same.  To learn how to order signed copies, click here. Thanks in advance!

Click on image above to order Bob's books.

Click on image above to order Bob’s books.

Army Lawyer Surfaces in New Bogus Prosecution Effort

Though he might be familiar to those in Army legal circles, Maj. Jacob D. Bashore didn’t become known to me until about four years ago when I began investigating the wrongful prosecution and conviction of Army Sgt. 1st Class Kelly A. Stewart. Much to my surprise, his name surfaced again today — and in a similarly-negative context.

This photo shows an Army depiction of court-martial proceedings in progress, but is unrelated to the individuals mentioned in this article.

This photo shows an Army depiction of court-martial proceedings in progress, but is unrelated to the individuals mentioned in this article.

Bashore, whose name appears in an early chapter of my first nonfiction book, Three Days In August, was a captain at the time he appeared on my “radar screen” as the trial counsel who led the prosecution effort against Stewart, a highly-decorated Green Beret combat veteran. What troubled me about his work — and became the reason I wrote the book — was that the prosecution was based almost solely on the false claims of rape and kidnapping made by a then-28-year-old German woman with a history of mental illness.

Despite a complete lack of physical evidence and eyewitnesses, and thanks largely to an inept military judge’s decision to proceed with the case after the accuser and German government officials refused to allow her medical records to be introduced to the court, Captain Bashore managed to win convictions on several lesser counts that resulted in Stewart being sentenced to eight years behind bars. Per the book’s title, that military trial took place during three days in August 2009.

Now, fast forward to today when Major Bashore’s name appeared on my radar as the special victim prosecutor assigned to the case of Maj. Christian “Kit” Martin, an Army officer assigned to the 101st Airborne Division at Fort Campbell, Ky.

Major Martin, who began his military career as an Army private and went on to become an officer and fly a range of attack helicopter missions in combat, is facing dubious allegations that could bring a stunning and disastrous end to his stellar 29-year military career. Moreover, guilty counts on all charges could result in him being sent to prison for 58 years — a virtual life sentence!

Major Bashore, on the other hand, seems to be pursuing a conviction against Major Martin in much the same way he pursued Stewart six years ago; he seems willing to do and/or say anything to achieve a conviction while satisfying his Army superiors, many of whom seem more focused on keeping liberal politicians — namely U.S. Senators Claire McCaskill (D-Mo.) and Kristen Gillibrand (D-NY), two bought-and-paid-for politicians who’ve apparently refused to read Lindsay L. Rodman’s well-written piece, Fostering Constructive Dialogue on Military Sexual Assault, published in Joint Force Quarterly 69 by National Defense University Press — than on achieving just outcomes inside military courtrooms.

Major Martin, however, is not sitting by idly while the Army constructs the casket inside which his career and freedom might be placed if he’s found guilty during a military trial expected to begin in October. In fact, I learned he’s spent close to $100,000 on lawyers and private investigators so far, and their efforts have turned up some incredible things.

Stay tuned for more details as I review documentation related to this monumental injustice that appears to be taking shape at Fort Campbell.

For links to other articles of interest as well as photos and commentary, join me on Facebook and Twitter.  Please show your support by buying my books and encouraging your friends and loved ones to do the same.  To learn how to order signed copies, click here. Thanks in advance!

Click on image above to order Bob's books.

Click on image above to order Bob’s books.