Tag Archives: World War II

Bob McCarty Offers Weekly Recap: Nov 15

This week was a productive one at Bob McCarty Headquarters. Below are snippets about what kept me busy:

Click image above to read post about a World War II V-MAIL message.

Click image above to read post about a World War II V-MAIL message.

SUNDAY, Nov. 9: In addition to announcing that my first crime-fiction novel had hit the marketplace in the post, The National Bet Now on Sale in Paperback, Ebook, I shared a piece about one method of communication used by Soldiers — including my dad — during World War II. Finally, I offered an update to an exclusive report I published two days earlier about the Oklahoma City Bombing trial taking place in Salt Lake City.

MONDAY, Nov. 10:  I shared news about something I have in common with the nation’s most-popular talk radio host in my post, Rush Limbaugh Threatens to Sue Democrat Committee.

TUESDAY, Nov. 11: On Veterans Day, I shared news about several special men in my life. The ones in my post, Story of Four Not-So-Famous Brothers Inspires, served during World War II. The one in my post, Wrongly Convicted By Military Justice System, American Soldiers Deserve as Much Attention as GITMO Detainees, served in the modern Army.

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 12:  I offered a warning in my post, YOU Might Be On A Federal Watch List!

THURSDAY, Nov. 13:  I showed off my printed wares along with dozens of other authors at a book lover’s event in O’Fallon, Mo.

FRIDAY, Nov. 14: On this busy day, I shared news about an auction, an interrogator, an indictment and a Saturday talk radio appearance on “TIPPING POINT with BOONE CUTLER” in Reno, Nev.

FYI: A film crew from Los Angeles will be visiting soon to interview me as part of a documentary they’re shooting. Though I can’t divulge more details at this time, I can tell you that the findings I share inside my second nonfiction book, The Clapper Memo, will be front and center. Meanwhile, I hope you’ll read and share my pieces and, of course, buy my books — including the one endorsed by Santa Claus. Thanks in advance!

Click on image above to order Bob's books.

Click on image above to order Bob’s books.

Story of Four Not-So-Famous Brothers Inspires

One of the most popular stories about members of the “Greatest Generation” is that of “The Fighting Sullivans,” five brothers who who died aboard the U.S.S. Juneau during the Battle of Guadalcanal.  That story is heroic, in part, because it has to do with men who made the ultimate sacrifice for their country during World War II.

The Fighting Sullivans shared a lot in common with my dad and his brothers.

The Fighting Sullivans shared a lot in common with my dad and his brothers.

Whenever I hear talk about the Sullivans, however, I can’t help but think of four not-so-famous Iowa brothers — Max, Verle, Guy and Ted — who also answered their nation’s call.  Like many thousands of others, they set aside any personal plans they had for a while and went into harm’s way to fight for freedom.

Max, the oldest, was among the first to be drafted into the Army.  Next in line, Verle went to the Navy.  Guy followed, donning Army green. By March 1943, only the youngest son remained at home.  That fact prompted a conversation to take place between Ted, the youngest brother at 19, and his father.

“Ted, do you want me to declare you essential to my farm work?” his dad asked, knowing that one son from each farm family could be deferred from entering service if he was needed to work on the farm.

Ted took little time to answer.

“No.  If my brothers can go into the service, then I feel that I should go also,” he said, adding, “Besides, I want to do my part in the war” and “Dad, you really don’t need me.”

It wasn’t long before Ted was drafted and assigned to the Army’s 406th Regiment of the 102nd Infantry Division at Camp Swift near Austin, Texas.

Though I don’t have many details about the service records of the three oldest brothers, I do know that two of them — and their brother Ted — saw front line combat action. In addition, I know that all four brothers came home alive.

This story is important to me, because I knew all of the men in this story. The three oldest brothers were my uncles, and the youngest was — and still is — my dad. Together, I suppose, they could have been known as The Fighting McCarty Brothers.

After the war, Max and Verle went on to own and operate a successful water well drilling company in Promise City, Iowa.  Guy went to work for the federal government, playing an important role in the effort to harness atomic energy.  My dad became a petroleum geologist, active in oil and natural gas exploration and development in Oklahoma for several decades.

Today, my 90-year-old dad is the only McCarty brother left to talk about the “last great war.” On Veterans Day, I salute him and all who’ve served.

Click on image above to order Bob's books.

Click on image above to order Bob’s books.